Suing Windfarms for Nuisance

Once again the Aussies take the lead. This is a DIY kit on how to sue windfarms in Aussie, including examples of Particulars of Claim. Clearly these must be changed to reflect Irish law and practice, but it is a great starting point, full of good ideas.

 

Over the last few weeks there has been an uptick in chatter about long dormant wind farm projects being resurrected, which has more to do with anxious developers hoping to offload their projects than any kind of renewed confidence in Australia’s precarious renewable energy policies. In the main, this rush of panicked activity is about […]

via First Strike: Communities Threatened by Wind Farms Gathering Own Noise Data to Later Sue Turbine Hosts & Developers in Nuisance — STOP THESE THINGS

Posted in BSB Community Energy Ltd, Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EIA Directive 2014/52/EU, EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Framore Limited, High Court; Judge Caroline Costello; John Callaghan; Leave to Appeal, Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, Kilvinane Wind Farm Ltd; substituted consent, Law; High Court; Leave To Appeal; Environment, Legal Costs; Access to Justice; Courts, NREAP; National Renewable Energy Action Plan; EU Commission; Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee; ACCC, Pat Swords, Paudie Coffey; series compensation; Fine Gael; Alan Kelly; Alex White, Peremptory law; Directory Law; Planning and Devlopment Act of 2000, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Planning Permission; Extension; Planning and Development Act, Wind Farm Contract, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten, Wind Turbine Syndrome; Professor Alun Evans, Wind Turbines: Esen Fatma Kabadayi Whiting | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

So you say you wanna Revolution?

peaceful protest

“You say you want a revolution

Well, you know

We all want to change the world

You tell me that it’s evolution

Well, you know

We all want to change the world

 

 

You say you’ll change the constitution

Well, you know

We all want to change your head

You tell me it’s the institution

Well, you know

You’d better free your mind instead.”

 

“Revolution” The Beatles (1968)   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGLGzRXY5Bw

 

At this time of year we in Ireland remember those brave men and women of the Easter Uprising. Whilst it is a huge event in Irish history, and the penultimate milestone in throwing off the English colonial yoke, it might be argued that the real revolution is yet to happen. The revolution of the mind. A fundamental change in how people think, and more specifically a fundamental change in how people think about those that govern them.

I am teaching in Germany at the moment, which is why this blog has not been published as regularly as it should be. However, Pat Swords published something the other day about the Swedish model of public participation, and that got me thinking about the docile nature of Irish politics, and how we just process the shit that politicians spew out, either accepting it or rejecting it, but never really providing an alternative version of our own.

Pat suggested that the key reason that Sweden was so successful, and this goes for the Nordic countries in general, is that the citizen is empowered by interacting in a transparent manner with local structures, in which there are strong checks and balances in relation to the decisions being made in that area. Hence, in that part of the world the citizen isn’t as frustrated with the political system, or with what is perceived as the injustices and corruption integral to the State apparatus. If an injustice is perceived, the citizen body will kick up a racket, supported by an investigative press, and things will happen. This is not to say that Sweden is a perfect political model, but when you compare it to Ireland, where all decisions are centralised and determined by (the inner sanctum of) the Cabinet and the Party Whip, and of course kept as far away from the citizen as possible (on a buried layer in a website, for example), it is certainly a far better model.

And what do we do? We moan and grumble for a couple of days, curse the cute hoors, and then live with it until the next mess comes along.

Pat further argued that public participation was around in those Nordic countries long before Aarhus, which is why the Aarhus Treaty was never a major issue with these countries, as it simply confirmed what was there already. On the other hand, successive governments (and the courts) have resisted and restricted and effectively hamstrung the Aarhus Treaty and its implementation in Ireland every step of the way.

The system of challenging planning decisions is also fundamentally more transparent and fair than the Irish model of appealing to the now infamous and thoroughly discredited An Bord Pleanala, followed by a judicial review on the narrowest grounds known in our law.

Contrast the Swedish model:

Appeal and administrative review

A final administrative decision may be appealed. A municipal decision is generally appealed to the regional county administrative board, and further to the land and environmental courts. The decision of a higher authority is, however, generally appealed to the land and environmental courts directly. The above-described governmental decisions may be subject to a specific judicial review procedure before the Supreme Administrative Court (Act 2006:304).

An administrative decision may also be reviewed by the original decision-making authority, independently of the appeal. The administrative authority has a legal duty (FL 27 §) to change a clearly incorrect decision, at least if such correction is simple and quick, but the decision cannot be to the detriment of other parties. This administrative review procedure is therefore of limited use in cases involving several parties of conflicting interests. Administrative review can be made in response to an application or on the authority’s own initiative. Administrative appeal is submitted to the decision-making authority for forwarding to the appellate body. This system provides opportunity for review and hence correcting an incorrect decision without having to go to court. In environmental cases there is no obligation to apply for such review before appealing an administrative decision.

The administrative appeals procedure in Sweden is as a rule reformatory and one of full appeal. This means that the administrative courts decide cases on the merits as well as legality of the appealed administrative decision, and that they can replace the appealed decision with a new one. Within the limits of the claim, the court takes on the role of the authority that made the appealed decision, and thus in principle acts as a public authority making an administrative decision. The ultimate responsibility for the investigation of the case rests with the court according to the “ex officio principle”. The point of departure is that the original decision-making authority should have ensured sufficient decision-making material, but if needed the court has to take on this responsibility. They should therefore look beyond the appealed decision and scrutinise the decision-making materials. The court may then order the parties to provide materials, or they can acquire it themselves. “

(https://e-justice.europa.eu/content_access_to_justice_in_environmental_matters-300-se-en.do?member=1 )

 

What a difference to our closed and effectively dead-end system, which is cost-prohibitive to most ordinary people. Can you imagine what our environmental groups could achieve, given the number of people with a good focused knowledge of environmental compliance, and not necessarily a lawyer or somebody with deep enough pockets to be able to afford a lawyer? We could really put the brakes on unsuitable development and the rape of our countryside.

What does the same person get here in Ireland? Sleepless nights and a permanent state of mental and physical exhaustion, brought about by the constant banging of your head against the bureaucratic brick wall.

And what else does active citizen participation bring, apart from a cleaner and healthier countryside? It brings happiness. There are five Nordic countries in the top 10 happiest countries of the world, in positions 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10. I deliberately chose Sweden as they are at number 10. In other words the system of civic participlation in the least happiest Nordic country is still way better than ours! See http://worldhappiness.report/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2017/03/HR17.pdf

So let us have a proper revolution, a revolution of the mind, of our attitudes, of getting off our arses and demanding greater transparency. This is the existing EU law, it is not a theoretical pipe-dream. However, it remains a pipe-dream unless we as citizens demand that it is properly implemented.

Posted in An Bord Pleanala; appeal; interested parties, Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, Easter Uprising, 1916 Revolution, Independence, IRA., Freedom of Information; Access to Environmental Information; AIE; Commissioner for Environmental Information, lobbying; democracy; political process; general election, Pat Swords, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Press Freedom, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters; Aarhus Convention; Aarhus Treaty | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Cans can bounce (back)

6a0133f440106f970b01543247eaef970c

There have been a number of interesting comments on Nigel’s blog of last week, “Kicking Cans”. One of those was a link to a German article by a medical doctor on important new research regarding the dangers of infrasound emitted by wind turbines. The ever tenacious Nigel de Haas has again offered his literary and editing skills by providing a readable translation of this article, which I reproduce here (the highlights and spacing are mine):

 

DR. MED. THOMAS CARL STILLER

March 27, 2017

Infrasound – the boomerang of energy sources

Dr. Thomas Carl Stiller is a specialist physician of general medicine and co-founder of “Doctors for Emission Control” (AEFIS).

 

People living in proximity to wind power plants often describe their complaints concerning low-frequency noise (infrasound) from these plants as “I feel what you cannot hear.”

But what is the cause of infrasound, what impact does it have on people, what standards regulate the permissible sound emissions and what is the state of science on these issues?

Inaudible but biophysiologically effective sound is not science fiction but an increasing threat to health.

First, a few physical bases: sound is the pressure change in a medium such as air and spreads around the source. The lower the frequency, the more sound is transported in the air. Very low frequencies are also transmitted through closed buildings. As a result of acoustic reflections and superimpositions, it can then lead to excessively high sound pressure values. In general, sounds and noises are described by frequency, timbre and volume. The human ear can hear frequencies approximately in the range of 20,000 Hz, i.e., vibrations per second (high tones) to 20 Hz (low tones). The sound range above a frequency of 20,000 Hz is referred to as ultrasound, below 200 Hz as low-frequency sound, below 20 Hz as ultrasound. Both infrasound and ultrasound are no longer perceived by the ear, but the body has a subtle perception for infrasound, and some people are particularly sensitive to low-frequency sound. In nature, low-frequency vibrations are ubiquitous. For example, some migratory birds orient themselves by the noise of the sea which is transmitted over several hundred kilometres in the atmosphere.

The infrasound from wind turbines is still measurable for several kilometres1.

On the other hand, humans are often exposed to technically generated ultrasound in their immediate surroundings. In residential areas, in the age of energy efficiency regulations for new buildings, air heat pumps are increasingly used as energy sources, which are cheaper to purchase than many other heating systems. In operation, however, they are often annoying for the neighbours, if the compressors are too loud and run too long. Even more problematic are wind power plants, in particular the modern large plants, which are mostly placed in front of villages and settlements at a small distance from the housing development. A pressure wave is generated every time a rotor blade is passed in front of the tower; many people perceive this as periodic “thumping”, sometimes also at a distance of several kilometres. The consequences of technically generated infrasound are only gradually becoming understood. About 10 – 30 percent of the population is sensitive to infrasound radiation. These people, which in Germany number several million, develop numerous symptoms, which are now understood by more and more physicians. The lowfrequency oscillations from compressors and wind power plants cause stress reactions in these people, which manifest themselves in sleep disorders, concentration disorders, nausea, tinnitus, dysphasia, dizziness, cardiac arrhythmia, fatigue, depression and anxiety disorders, earaches and permanent hearing impairments.

From a physiological point of view, there is damage to the hair cells of the cortical organ of the auditory canal and to permanent irritation in cerebral arteries, such as the amygdala (anxiety centre)2.

Effects on the heart and blood vessels included diseased changes of the connective tissue in the arteries of the pericardium (heart bag) detected in experiments3 with animals which were exposed to infrasound for a long duration. Those affected cannot escape the effects of health and harassment. They are often ineffective for a long period of time. A neurobiological habituation of sensitive persons on technical infrasound is not known. It is often falsely asserted that the symptoms are attributable to the attitude of persons concerned about the sources of the infrasound. Unfortunately, this is not observed in medical practice; the symptoms are all sensitive.

Numerous international studies have been carried out over the last few years, but in Germany this research is not advanced and almost unknown at the political level. If the symptoms occur, however, those affected are often hardly in a position to react. Those who live in a residential area affected by low-frequency noise and infrasound radiation cannot usually move away if, for example, they have to sell their house, which has lost a lot of value due to nearby wind power plants.

Who can perform optimally in today’s working world if sleep deprived and unable to find peace and quiet in their home by pervasive infrasound loading4.

How long can those affected compensate for this healthily and financially? Infrasound-sensitive people are ensnared in a tragic dilemma: their complaints are not taken seriously and legally they do not go further because of the lack of emission control regulations.

The acoustician Steven Cooper, together with a wind farm operator in Australia, investigated the effects of infrasound on the local population. Local residents in the vicinity of a nearby wind park complained about the above symptoms. But they did not have the wind farm directly in front of them. Cooper had their symptoms recorded at an exact time and checked the correlation with the activity of the wind power plants; the symptoms were strongest when the wind power plants were particularly active5.

In Denmark, information on malformed foetuses and miscarriages on a mink farm where wind turbine installations were subsequently built, as well as frequent reports of disease symptoms of people near wind power plants, led to a moratorium on wind energy expansion, pending completion of investigation of the connections.

The subject of infrasound radiation has also been taken seriously for some time6.  All previously valid protection standards, such as the Technische Anleitung (TA) noise and the DIN 45680, are based on the assumption that only sound which can be perceived by the ear can be damaged7. Other forms of the perception of sound are excluded. The measurement regulations are also not helpful, since only sound above 8 Hz is measured, although modern instruments can also detect frequencies of <1 Hz and the infrasound range in the range 1 – 8 Hz causes particularly severe health impairments.

The prescribed sound measurements also average individual frequency peaks. They are based on the decibel A filter, which follows the human auditory curve in the audible sound range and measures on many different frequencies rather than linearly and narrowly, as would be appropriate to avoid health hazards in the infrasound range.

Furthermore, often obsolete measuring systems and microphones that do not measure accurately enough in the infrasonic range are still permitted within the scope of the currently valid regulations for measurement. As a result, the measurement of the sound phenomena that are harmful to human beings does not take place below 20 Hz. Since these measurement regulations are the basis for approval procedures for technical systems, they must be adapted to the current state of the art. There would be a direct effect if the standards and regulations for the approval procedures of technical installations were at the level of the international state of knowledge. Were the standards for sound pressure to correspond to the state of the art, the limits for infrasound pressure would be set lower, the models for the propagation of infrasound would correspond to the state of research and the construction of plants would be optimized in terms of emissions of low-frequency sound. If technical sources of infrasound radiation are not removed quickly and sustainably enough by wind turbines, public complaints will develop into a health boomerang with respect to energy sources.

A new national disease on a par with diabetes and cancer is now inevitable given the failure of governments to act. It is high time for politically responsible people to meet their protection obligation for humans and nature and to initiate the most important measures from the point of view of preventive medicine an immediate dismantling of wind power, greater minimum distances between humans and wind power plants, prioritise objective infrasound research coupled with modern measurement regulations in the corresponding DIN standards and stricter protective regulations directed at sound physics and biology.

 

Footnotes

1 Lars Ceranna, Gernot Hartmann & Manfred Henger; “The inaudible sound of wind turbines – infrasound measurements on a wind turbine north of Hanover, Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Unit B3.11, Seismology, 2004

2 AN Salt, JT Lichtenhan; “Perception-based protection from low-frequency sound may not be enough”; InterNoise 2012. http://oto2.wustl.edu/cochlea . AN Salt, JT Lichtenhan; “How does wind turbine noise affect people?”, 2014.

3 Alves-Pereira M, Castelo Branco NA; Prog. Biophys. Mol. Biol. 2007 Jan-Apr 93 (1-3): 256-79. Epub 2006 Aug 4; “Vibroacoustic disease: biological effects of infrasound and low-frequency noise elucidated by mechanotransduction cellular signaling”.

4 Claire Paller (2014). “Exploring the Association between Proximity to Industrial Wind Turbines and Self-Reported Health Outcomes in Ontario, Canada”; UWSpace, http://hdl.handle.net/10012/8268.

5 Steven Cooper; “Cape Bridgewater Wind Farm”; 44.5100.R7: MSC; Prepared for: Energy Pacific (Vic) Pty Ltd, Level 11, 474 Flinders Street, Melbourne VIC 3000, Date: 26th Nov, 2014.

6 Robert Koch Institute; “Infrasonic and low-frequency sound – a topic for environmental health protection in Germany?”, Communication from the Commission “Methods and quality assurance in environmental medicine”. Position paper of the doctors for emission control (www.aefis.de).

7 Standards: DIN 45680, 45401, 45651; Technical guidance noise (TA noise). “Acoustics – Attenuation of sound in outdoor propagation – Part 2: General calculation method”. DIN EN 61260: 2003-03; “Electroacoustics – Band filters for octaves and fractions of octaves”; DIN EN 61400-11; “Wind energy installations, Part 11: Sound-measurement methods, acoustics, electroacoustics”; “Standard frequencies for measurements” (retracted), “Octave filters for electroacoustic measurements” (withdrawn

Posted in Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, The Spokes of the Wheel; wind farms; Ireland; Windfall, Wind Farm Contract, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten, Wind Turbine Syndrome; Professor Alun Evans | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Kicking Cans?

pass the buck

I have had too much on the go to be able to do another blog, so I am very happy to welcome an experienced wind warrior and ethical activist, Nigel de Haas, to tell us about his correspondence with the esteemed Minister.

Copies of the letters can be found at the end of the blog:

 

“A LOUD CLANG AS THE CAN GETS KICKED (AGAIN)

The Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment has responded to a letter that I wrote to him on 14th February by letter dated 27th March in which he has clarified the following points of public interest:
● A review of the Wind Energy Guidelines is a key commitment in the Programme for Government (May 2016);
● The review of Wind Energy Guidelines began in December 2013;
● This is a very technical area and engagement between the DCCAE and the DHPCLG is ongoing in order to bring the review to completion;
● The proposed new guidelines will be subject to SEA and associated public consultation before they are finalised by Government.

And so dear folks, having sat on their hands for three years since the close of public consultation, and having sat on the findings of the July 2015 RPS Report for two years and despite having committed to issuing the revised guidelines by November last year, the Minister and his Department intend to kick the can right out of the stadium, let alone down the road.

How far we have travelled from the lofty promises of the Programme for a Partnership Government, where Section 13.3.K) addressed the Rights of Local Communities and Indigenous Energy Generation with the words:

“The new Government understands the divisions and distress caused in local communities who feel that new energy infrastructure, like wind farms and pylons are imposed on them. The technology and scale of wind farms has evolved significantly since the last set of planning guidelines were introduced in 2006. As a matter of urgency the new Government will update the wind farm planning guidelines, within 3 to 6 months, to offer a better balance between the concerns of local communities and the need to invest in indigenous energy projects. These new planning guidelines will be informed by the public consultation process and best international practice”.

Words it seems are not the same as promises. Perhaps they are the new alternative reality? The subject of my letter to Minister Naughten of 14th February was the Public Disclosure finding by the Commissioner for Environmental Information in case CEI-15-0032 where he stated that:

“If disclosure were to lead to a submission being made to either or both Departments which was of such significance that it could not be ignored, such a submission would appear to be highly important and very much in the public interest.”

The disclosure referred to included a report commissioned by SEAI and prepared by RPS in 2015, showing that the size and ramifications of planned wind farm development far exceed the parameters in current use. Section 3.2.3 of the report states that the typical wind turbine size in any future development is likely to have a power rating of 3.5MW and a tip height of 150 to 175m (up to 190m in low-wind areas).

This is five (5) times larger than the 0.66MW wind turbines typically installed in 2006 when WEDG06 was issued.

Table 3.2 of the report shows that an estimated setback distance of 1209m would be necessary to meet the 40dB absolute noise limit proposed in the draft revision of WEGD06, and even with a 45dB limit the setback is estimated as 782m.

Compare these (Government-Commissioned Study) figures to Section 5.6 of WEDG06 which states:

“noise is unlikely to be a significant problem where the distance from the nearest turbine to any noise sensitive property is more than 500 metres”.

The disclosure is certainly of a significance that cannot be ignored, and it is indeed in the public interest that the following submission should be made:

The proposed revision to the Wind Energy Development Guidelines (WEDG06) is now three years overdue;
● The existing, obsolete guidelines do not afford proper protection to rural residents;
● The Government has been shown by the CEI-ordered disclosure above to have commissioned modelling that reinforces the point that WEDG06 does not afford proper protection to rural residents.

Public planning policy implemented by all administrations in Ireland over the past 50 years or more has supported dispersed rural housing rather than the consolidated settlement pattern found in continental Europe where farms are huge and farm labour lives in consolidated hamlets and villages. Irish farms have historically been small, and sons and daughters frequently build on parcels of land from the family farm, or farmers have sold off plots to people who prefer to live in the quiet of the countryside.

The direct consequence of this historic planning policy is that there is far less potential to develop wind farms in Ireland than there is in continental Europe, without adversely affecting the lives of large numbers of people who have their homes in rural Ireland. Key Objective 5.6.1 of the draft revision to WEDG06:

“seeks to achieve a balance between the protection of residential amenity of neighbouring communities in the vicinity of wind energy developments, and facilitating the meeting of national renewable energy targets”.

The Minister is not convinced; in his letter of 27th March he takes the following position on the RPS report and setback distances:

● Key to the (RPS) calculations were the accumulation of worst-case based scenarios meaning that the figures arrived at cannot always represent likely real world situations;
● The figures should therefore be considered as maximum theoretical distances at which wind farm noises can be detected at the specified levels, rather than as minimum distances required to reduce noise intensities to those levels;
● This highlights the complexity of the conditions under investigation in the review of the guidelines currently under way.

It is all sort of flexible, squeezy stuff. Especially a setback of 1209m, which the Minister considers to be a maximum theoretical distance at which wind farm noises can be detected at a level of 40dB (the noise level first mooted by his Department in the 2013 draft Targeted Revision of the Wind Energy Guidelines).

The long suffering residents of rural Ireland have a better chance of resolving how many angels can dance on the head of a pin than getting any reasonable level of protection against inappropriately closely sited wind farms from the Ministers of DCCAE and DHPCLG any time soon.

And in the intervening period, more and more wind farms will happily pass through the planning process bound only by the outdated 500m setback, 43/45dB noise limit and permissible levels of shadow flicker.

Whatever happened to the concerned Minister for Communications, Climate Change and Environment who told the Dáil on 6th October 2016 that “I am as anxious as anybody else to have these new guidelines put in place as the current guidelines are not fit for purpose”?

Nigel de Haas
Dunmanway, Co. Cork.

Letter to Minister from Nigel

Reply to Nigel from Minister

Posted in Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, NREAP; National Renewable Energy Action Plan; EU Commission; Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee; ACCC, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten, Wind Turbine Syndrome; Professor Alun Evans | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Minister concedes to setback and zoning for wind farms in Donegal

Well done Councillor Campbell! We need more like you!

Concerned About Wind Turbines - Donegal

In the end Minister Coveney skulked out of the legal hearings which would have tested his powers under section 31 of the Planning and Development Act to overturn the democratically passed variation no. 2 to Donegal County Development Plan, dealing with wind energy development.

Councillor John Campbell who took the legal challenge announced the end of this, his second successful foray in the courts against a Ministerial direction, on twitter, where he also highlighted the extent of the shameful delaying tactics of the Minister and his Department:

What is notable is that when tested neither the Minister nor his Department were able to open any documents or arguments in support of their position in court, they merely…

View original post 629 more words

Posted in EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF | Leave a comment

Wind energy is not the answer to Ireland’s emission problem

A beautifully written piece, compelling in its logic and fundamental common sense, by Paula Byrne, who is the spokesperson for Wind Aware Ireland.

Paula Byrne

(Image and text courtesy of the Irish Times)

“Claims by the the Government and the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) that wind power can be used to de-carbonise our energy system are not justified by the available evidence. A rudimentary cost benefit analysis (CBA) to examine ways of decarbonising would have shown how deeply flawed this policy is.

Moneypoint power station, alone, produces 4.7 million tonnes of CO2 annually by burning cheap imported coal, twice the amount our collective 1,500 turbines save. Wind turbines spread over some of the most beautiful parts of Ireland save a paltry 3 to 4 per cent of overall CO2 emissions according to the SEAI (2.4 million tonnes) and less according to other analysts.

If a CBA had been undertaken, it is most likely that converting Moneypoint to sustainable biomass or clean gas would have emerged as a better option than wind, saving billions of euros, with better environmental outcomes. Likewise, upgrading our present stock of badly insulated homes may have been identified as another viable option. A Green minister and a powerful lobby group meant that no CBA was carried out and none of these options properly explored before industrial wind was rolled out.

Because the wind doesn’t always blow, wind turbines produce about 30 per cent of their maximum potential output. Electricity is very difficult to store and to date no feasible, cost effective, grid-scale storage technology suitable for Ireland has emerged. Consequently, intermittent electricity must always be backed up by conventional generation to provide power on demand – a basic expectation in Ireland. No conventional generation has been closed down because of wind.

The Public Spending Code mandates the appraisal and evaluation of any project with capital expenditure of more than €20 million by means of CBA. Furthermore, projects and plans with environmental implications must be evaluated according to the European Strategic Environmental Assessment Directive, which provides a high level of protection to the environment as well as giving citizens the right to participate in environmental decisions. Both assessments require consideration of alternative methods of achieving the objective of CO2 emission reduction, yet neither has been carried out.

The social impacts of wind energy in rural Ireland are enormous. The wind industry continues to operate a ruthless cloak-and-dagger, divide-and-conquer strategy. “Community gain funds” and payouts have resulted in disharmony and disagreement among neighbours, sometimes causing major family fallouts.

Turbine construction is governed by out-dated planning guidelines – described by the Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment, Denis Naughten, in Dáil Eireann as “unfit for purpose” – which allow them just 500m from homes, sometimes resulting in devastating consequences for families. The issue of noise from turbines recently made the headlines when Enercon Wind Farm Services Ireland Ltd admitted liability for nuisance caused to seven families who abandoned their homes in 2011 due to noise. Other affected families will probably take similar court actions.

The Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment has known since 2015 that the minimum setback distance of a turbine from a house required to protect human health from noise is far greater than that currently recommended. This information, which emerged from an Access to Environmental Information enquiry, was kept under departmental wraps and publication of updated planning guidelines promised by the Minister within six months of this government’s formation have been repeatedly postponed.

Currently wind turbines are reaching heights of 160m and heading for 250m. The devastation of our landscape is happening and accelerating, affecting communities forced to live in this industrialised landscape, tourists visiting Ireland and natural habitats.

Wind energy generation is heavily subsidised. The Public Service Obligation paid to the wind industry reached €240 million this year. The dispersed nature of wind farms and their intermittent output requires the electricity grid to be upgraded at an estimated cost of €3.5 billion, another unaccounted-for subsidy to the industry borne by consumers. In addition, the government forgoes revenue by allowing tax breaks to wind-farm investors.

The Minister continues to support a misguided and uncosted policy that delivers little for the environment at enormous cost to our economy and landscape, and which threatens the health and well-being of rural dwellers upon whom these industrial developments are forced. Promises were made to rural Ireland before the last election; the Minister and this government have broken them.

The continued failure to ask basic questions and the unwavering support for wind energy without even a rudimentary CBA is reminiscent of the politics that mismanaged the Irish economy into bankruptcy in 2008. It would seem that we are doomed to repeat the exercise in the field of renewable energy.”

Posted in Academic Research; Peer-Review Process; Medical Journals, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EIA Directive 2014/52/EU, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Green Party; Ireland; Eamonn Ryan; Cormac Manning, Ms Justice Costello; Section 37A Planning and Development Act 2000;, NREAP; National Renewable Energy Action Plan; EU Commission; Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee; ACCC, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA); Grid 25; North-South Interconnector, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Hidden Human Tragedy Caused by Incessant Wind Turbine Noise

“A minimum 1.25 mile setback.” These are the distances we should be talking about in Ireland. In other words, at least 2 km (2000 metres).

STOP THESE THINGS

wind-turbines-near-house

Helen Schwiesow Parker, PhD, is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and a Past Clinical Supervisory Faculty member at the University of Virginia Medical School.  Her career includes practical experience in the fields of autism, sensory perception, memory and learning, attention deficit and anxiety disorders, including panic disorder and PTSD.

In this well-crafted piece, Helen details the misery and suffering which is caused by incessant turbine generated low-frequency noise and infrasound and maliciously covered up by the wind industry and its political enablers.

The Secret, Silent Wind Power Peril
Master Resource
Helen Schwiesow Parker
7 February 2017

The General Problem

“From a distance, many view the massive turbines as majestic – as a clean, seemingly quiet and free source of endless energy. To numerous residents clustered within 2km (1.25 miles) or more of the pulsing machines, however, the Industrial-scale Wind Turbines (IWT) bring strangely debilitating illness – incapacitating for some, yet scoffed at by the…

View original post 5,602 more words

Posted in EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF | Leave a comment

Have Your Say! Revision of Wind Energy Development Guidelines 2006

denis-the-menace-naughten

Minister Denis Naughten

That excellent web site Concerned About Wind Turbines – Donegal  (CAWT) has put important and previously cunningly concealed information into the public domain by an AIE request to our old friends, the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment.

Despite the Department playing hide-the-parcel, the Commissioner for Environmental Information( CEI) gave them a slap on the head and told them to reveal their dark secrets.

See:
https://cawtdonegal.wordpress.com/2017/01/16/irish-government-modelling-of-wind-energy-potential/

The Commissioner made it clear that the information should have been made available to the public before any decision was made by the Department. The Commissioner also pointed out that this would enable the public to make submissions before any decisions were made.

.
It is a very sorry state of affairs when a Commissioner has to tell the government how democracy works. Hang your head, Minister Naughten, and off to the Naughty Corner you go.

.
http://www.ocei.gov.ie/en/Decisions/Decisions-List/Damien-McCallig-and-The-Department-of-Communications-Climate-Action-and-Environment-CEI-15-0032-.html

The documents that the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment were trying to hide consist of a report on Wind Turbine Noise Modelling commissioned from the RPG Group by Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (on behalf of the Department) dated 11 May 2015 and a series of subsequent data analyses against varied criteria up to 13 July 2015.

.

Startling New Information

When one considers that this was supposed to be a “tame report” filed under ‘His Master’s Voice’, it actually makes for very interesting reading. The report shows that the current clearance distances being discussed by the Department are woefully inadequate given the typical wind turbine size in any future development. Current wind turbines are likely to have (at least) a power rating of 3.5MW and a tip height of 150 to 175m (up to 200m in low-wind areas).  This is five (5) times larger than the 0.66MW wind turbines typically installed in 2006 when the current Guidelines were issued.

Table 3.2 of the report shows that an estimated setback distance of 1209m (i.e. 1.2 km) would be the absolute minimum distance necessary to meet the 40dB absolute noise limit proposed in the draft revision of the Wind Guidelines. Many argue that this 40dB limit is still not enough to ensure there is no distress caused to people in their homes, which means we should really be looking at 1.5 km; which is triple the current 500 metres!

The AIE has completely exposed the severely flawed planning policies being pursued by the current Government, and confirms what we all knew already – the current Guidelines offer absolutely no protection to rural residents.  The Government’s current action of sticking their heads in the sand whilst countless families are driven from their homes cannot be allowed to continue.

As pointed out on numerous occasions in previous blogs (and in our arguments to the UN), Ireland does not have the legacy of planned rural settlements like our European cousins, where a consolidated settlement pattern has been implemented for decades, even centuries. Their farms are huge and farm labour lives in consolidated hamlets and villages.  Irish farms have historically been small, and sons and daughters frequently build on parcels of land from the family farm, or farmers sell off plots to people who prefer to live in the quiet of the countryside. This means there are little farms and houses dotted haphazardly all over the place, and the spaces between people’s homes are not big enough to accommodate big industrial wind farms, particularly when they should be at least 1500 metres from the nearest house.

If we look at the draft Guidelines currently being circulated, “Key Objective 5.6.1” says it

“seeks to achieve a balance between the protection of residential amenity of neighbouring communities in the vicinity of wind energy developments, and facilitating the meeting of national renewable energy targets”.

The reality is the opposite of this claim – as turbines get more powerful, so the harm that they cause to people will also increase. Ireland was never really big enough for wind farms in 2006, but now it is an impossible dream without hurting a lot of people.

Planning is all about balancing competing interests.  The key tool used for this is Zoning Policy, whereby any industrial machinery or plants are kept well away from residential areas by appropriate zoning.  Industrial activities are directed to areas zoned for industrial use and homes are built in areas zoned for residential use.  This is a sensible approach that has stood the test of time. It is also not rocket science, just common sense.

However, when the issue of wind farms is put on the table, the rule book is thrown out of the window. How can this be lawful? It is illegal and unfair on so many levels.

What can we do about this?

The Department received submissions from 7,497 individuals and organisations in response to the public consultation on the proposed draft revisions to the 2006 Wind Energy Development Guidelines in relation to noise, setbacks and shadow flicker.

The Department’s web site currently states that following consideration of the submissions,  the revisions to the Guidelines will be finalised and issued to planning authorities under Section 28 of the Planning and Development  Act 2000 (as amended) during Quarter 3 2014.

http://www.housing.gov.ie/planning/guidelines/wind-energy/submissions

In other words, they are trying to tell us that the consultation is over. But how can there be a proper consultation without proper information?  The AIE Commissioner is also clearly of the view that further consultation should be allowed, given the discovery of this information that has been hidden from us.

We now know that for 18 months the Government has been hiding this information which clearly shows that the current setback of 500 metres is useless in protecting rural residents. Remembering that this is a “friendly” commissioned report, and that wind turbines are getting bigger and more powerful all the time, we should really be looking at a minimum setback distances of 1500 metres. Remembering that it takes the government over a decade to replace guidelines, perhaps we should plan for the future (a foreign concept to the Minister, it would seem) and ask for a setback distance of 2000 metres?

What must happen now is that each and every one of us to need make submissions to both Ministers, and to each of our constituency TDs and to each of our local County Councillors to let them know in no uncertain terms that we demand immediate action on bringing in proper protection against wind farms by having an effective setback distance of at least 1500 metres, preferably 2000 metres.

There were 7497 submissions back in 2013 – we can do better than that now!

 A template letter in Word format is attached here:   letter-template-wind-guidelines-2017         Please edit to taste and send to the Ministers and all your public representatives.  CAWT Donegal has opened the door – let’s use the opportunity!

Addresses

The Minister

Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment

29 – 31 Adelaide Road

Dublin

D02 X285

The Minister

Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government

Custom House

Dublin 1

D01 W6X0

Posted in An Bord Pleanala; appeal; interested parties, BSB Community Energy Ltd, Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EIA Directive 2014/52/EU, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Framore Limited, Freedom of Information; Access to Environmental Information; AIE; Commissioner for Environmental Information, Green Party; Ireland; Eamonn Ryan; Cormac Manning, Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, Kilvinane Wind Farm Ltd; substituted consent, Ministerial Responsibility; Liability; Negligence; cardiovascular, Pat Swords, Peremptory law; Directory Law; Planning and Devlopment Act of 2000, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Planning Permission; Extension; Planning and Development Act, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters; Aarhus Convention; Aarhus Treaty, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA); Grid 25; North-South Interconnector, The Spokes of the Wheel; wind farms; Ireland; Windfall, The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe’s (UNECE) Convention on Access to Information, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten, Wind Turbine Syndrome; Professor Alun Evans, Wind Turbines: Esen Fatma Kabadayi Whiting | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

It’s official – wind farms are a damned Nuisance

 

 

The tort of Nuisance – basic principles

The law of (private) nuisance has been around for a long time but it has always been a poor neighbour to the more commonly litigated torts of negligence and trespass.

In a nutshell, a nuisance is “any continuous activity or state of affairs causing a substantial and unreasonable interference with a [claimant’s] land or his use or enjoyment of that land”(Bamford v Turnley [1860] 3 B&S 62).  Private nuisance is a tort or civil wrong, unlike public nuisance, which is a crime.

Something that farmers leasing their land to wind farms might not know is that a landlord can be liable where the lease is granted for a purpose which constitutes a nuisance, as in Tetley v Chitty [1986] 1 All ER 663.

For there to be a claim in private nuisance, the claimant must show that the defendant’s actions caused damage. This can be physical damage, or discomfort and inconvenience. The test for remoteness of damage in nuisance is reasonable foreseeability. In other words, was it foreseeable that a wind turbine will cause discomfort and inconvenience to nearby dwellings?  The test is an objective one: was the nuisance reasonably foreseeable? If it was, the defendant is expected to avoid it.

It is impossible to specifically define what is or what is not unreasonable but factors that are taken into account include the nature of the locality where the nuisance took place, the time and duration of the interference and the conduct of the defendant.

The plaintiff must show that the defendant’s actions have caused an interference with their use or enjoyment of their land or home/property. These interferences are indirect, and almost always the result of continuing events rather than a one-off incident. The courts have allowed cases where the interference causes emotional distress, like continuous noise / infrasound for example.

The granting of planning permission does not constitute immunity from a claim in nuisance.

 

The families of Shivnen, Whelan/Walsh, Sexton, Sheehan, Duggan, McSweeney and O’Connor, versus Enercon Wind Farm Services  Ireland Limited and Carraigcannon Wind Farm Limited

It was with considerable interest then that we waited for the outcome of the action in nuisance brought by the seven families from Cork who were impacted by noise pollution from a nearby Enercon wind farm. A number of the families had to abandon their homes because of the severity of the noise and some lived up to a full kilometre from the wind farm.

A judgment against the wind farm would have constituted a powerful precedent to be used against the wind industry given the multitude of examples of Irish families living in misery due to unwelcome turbine neighbours. It was for that reason that the defendant settled the matter (probably at the instance of, and financial assistance from, IWEA). Although settlements are always better for the parties concerned as it avoids the huge emotional and financial cost of litigation, it does mean that we do not have that precedent in Irish law (although there are a number of foreign precedents – see https://the-law-is-my-oyster.com/2014/11/16/are-windfarms-torture-farms/).

Although the defendant wind farm admitted liability (nuisance-order-dec-2016) the wind industry will seek to minimise this by arguing that this was a “one-off” situation for any fallacious reason that they can think of: “the unique terrain; the extraordinary sensitivity of the plaintiffs; etc etc.” Expect a carefully worded press release soon in your nearest rag.

There is still one more opportunity to achieve a damning precedent though. The case is listed for ten days in the High Court commencing 25th April 2017 to deal with damages and costs. If the High Court was to make a massive award of damages (i.e. in the millions of euros) that would send a very strong message to the wind industry that Ireland is simply not suitable to build wind farms, due to the scattered population leaving very little wide open spaces. If they insist on erecting their monsters next to people’s homes, they must be prepared to pay a lot of money, which is what the wind industry is all about anyway – money. Don’t believe all the “green” rhetoric – if you hit them hard in the pocket, they will leave, our subsidies notwithstanding.

It is for that reason that there will very likely be a financial settlement. Good news for the families involved – they can avoid the ten days of litigation and get on with their lives, after a very hard five-year fight. Bad news for the Irish rural population, as again there will be no precedent and it is guaranteed that the settlement will come with a gag order that will prohibit any of the families disclosing the details of the financial settlement. One would almost pray for a wealthy benefactor to compensate the families up front so that the ten days’ litigation could continue (assuming that the notoriously conservative High Court would hand down a decent damages award in the millions). Any friendly millionaires out there willing to step up to the plate?

 

Posted in Academic Research; Peer-Review Process; Medical Journals, An Bord Pleanala; appeal; interested parties, Apple; Google; Data Centre, BSB Community Energy Ltd, Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF, Enercon, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, High Court; Judicial Review; Appeal on the merits; judicial discretion, Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, Legal Costs; Access to Justice; Courts, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Planning Permission; Extension; Planning and Development Act, The Spokes of the Wheel; wind farms; Ireland; Windfall, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten, Wind Turbine Syndrome; Professor Alun Evans, Wind Turbines: Esen Fatma Kabadayi Whiting | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Irish wind output lows of 2016

All the best CAWT for 2017 – keep up the good work!

Concerned About Wind Turbines - Donegal

2016-wind-low

As 2016 begins to fade into the memory the media will be full of lists of the “highs and lows” from the year.  Each year our blog report of the Irish wind farm output lows for the previous year (see 2014, 2015) is one of the most read posts on our blog, so here are the lows for 2016 (ROI).

As with last year our more traditional media only seem capable of reporting on wind output highs – no doubt the data is churned out of the Irish Wind Energy Association (IWEA) PR department, see for example New records set for wind energy generation across Ireland during Christmas 2016, and subsequent copy and paste articles on Irish Times and NewsTalk.

In order to provide a little balance set out below is a table of the lowest wind output recorded, for the Republic of Ireland, in each of the…

View original post 257 more words

Posted in EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF | Leave a comment

Clueless!

headuparse

Irish rural communities have been opposing wind farms, and pylons before that, for the better part of a decade. This has involved community groups gathering funds through church collections, cake sales, and the like. There are numerous tales of hardship where communities have had to beg, borrow and steal every penny they can get in order to fund a judicial review application. And yet, in November 2016, an elected “representative” in our Dail (the Irish parliament) can ask a question like this:

“I thank Dr. Kelly for her presentation and her staff for coming before the committee. There are a few things I wish to ask. I notice that An Bord Pleanála generally tries to make a decision on an application in 15 or 16 weeks. The one thing that stood out was the number of wind farm applications that were receiving refusals. I know that may be down to the court case and the court judgement, but there certainly seems to be many of them judging by the presentation Dr. Kelly made.

.
Increasingly, members have residents coming to us and asking about the judicial review process. We all tell them that it is a very costly affair and that they cannot afford to deal with it. That is a big problem. Do we have a rough idea of what a judicial review costs? I know it probably depends and varies, but I would like to get a rough idea. We have had some cases in which people have been requesting it.”

What is even richer is that he asks his equally clueless colleagues rather than getting off his arse and researching the matter himself. Did he even think of leaving his constituency office and approaching the community group?

.
God help us. ‘Cute hoors’ indeed. Is it any wonder that the voters have lost faith with the system and elect a Trump?

Posted in Academic Research; Peer-Review Process; Medical Journals, An Bord Pleanala; appeal; interested parties, Apple; Google; Data Centre, Arsin Demir, Çalık Holding; Turkey; EU; renewables, Brexit, BSB Community Energy Ltd, Cloud; iCloud; Data Centre; Data Center, Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EIA Directive 2014/52/EU, EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Framore Limited, Freedom of Information; Access to Environmental Information; AIE; Commissioner for Environmental Information, Green Party; Ireland; Eamonn Ryan; Cormac Manning, High Court; Judge Caroline Costello; John Callaghan; Leave to Appeal, High Court; Judicial Review; Appeal on the merits; judicial discretion, Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, judicial review; Wednesbury Test; O'Keeffe; rationality; Separation of Powers, Justine McCarthy; The Sunday Times; EMF, Kilvinane Wind Farm Ltd; substituted consent, Law; High Court; Leave To Appeal; Environment, Legal Costs; Access to Justice; Courts, lobbying; democracy; political process; general election, Ministerial Responsibility; Liability; Negligence; cardiovascular, Ms Justice Costello; Section 37A Planning and Development Act 2000;, North-South Interconnector; An Bord Pleanala, NREAP; National Renewable Energy Action Plan; EU Commission; Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee; ACCC, Pat Swords, Paudie Coffey; series compensation; Fine Gael; Alan Kelly; Alex White, Peremptory law; Directory Law; Planning and Devlopment Act of 2000, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Planning Permission; Extension; Planning and Development Act, Press Freedom, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters; Aarhus Convention; Aarhus Treaty, Refugees; Apartheid; Kulaks; Stalin;, Section 35; ESB Act 1927; wayleave notice, South Africa, wind turbines, developing nations,, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA); Grid 25; North-South Interconnector, The Spokes of the Wheel; wind farms; Ireland; Windfall, The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe’s (UNECE) Convention on Access to Information, Turkey; ABK Çeşme RES Enerji Elektrik Üretim A.Ş, Uncategorized, University Hospital Waterford, Val Martin, Wind Farm Contract, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten, Wind Turbine Syndrome; Professor Alun Evans | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

When the Boot is on the other Foot

 

 

Section 50 of the Planning and Development Act of 2000 (PDA 2000) is possibly one of the most unpopular sections when it comes to community organisations who battle big business, particularly wind farm developers. This is due to the fact that Section 50 limits their rights of redress against bad planning decisions to judicial review only.

 

As explained in previous blogs, the grounds of review are necessarily more limited and narrow than the grounds of appeal. With a judicial review, one is not able to challenge the decision itself (the merits) – in other words, “I think you are wrong”. The applicant is limited to challenging the procedure followed in reaching that decision, as opposed to the decision itself. The only challenge that is allowed against the decision itself is on the grounds of unreasonableness or irrationality, where essentially you have to show that the decision made is so crazy that only a lunatic could have made it (the so-called “Wednesbury Test”).

 

What however is good for the goose is good for the gander. If the planning authority is successfully overturned on review, they are expected to live with that decision. Accordingly, the planning authority’s scope of appeal is extremely limited:

Section 50(f)(i) of the PDA 2000 says that the decision of the review court is final, with only an extremely limited ground for appeal:

“The determination of the High Court of an application for leave to apply for judicial review, or of an application for judicial review, shall be final and no appeal shall lie from the decision of the High Court to the Supreme Court in either case, except with the leave of the High Court, which leave shall only be granted where the High Court certifies that its decision involves a point of law of exceptional public importance and that it is desirable in the public interest that an appeal should be taken to the Supreme Court.”

In other words, where a decision of An Bord Pleanala (ABP) is successfully challenged on review, ABP can only appeal that judgment to the Supreme Court if the High Court allows it to appeal. The High Court will only do that if it considers that its appeal raises points of law of “exceptional public importance”.

 

 

The facts

In the original case of Kathleen Connolly v An Bord Pleanála [2016] IEHC 322 (14 June 2016) a wind farm developer made a planning application to Clare County Council for a wind farm consisting of a number of turbines and associated works. The application was refused by the Council, and the wind farm developer appealed to ABP.

 

As is its usual procedure, the ABP appointed an inspector to prepare a report. The Clare County Council (following Kathleen Connolly’s submissions) had expressed concern about issues regarding habitat protection, the risk of water pollution, as well as issues concerning the assessment of noise and environmental effect, and the inspector was briefed accordingly.

 

The ABP also called on the developer to submit further specific information and revisions. This was by a notice issued in terms of Section 132 of the PDA 2000, which allows the ABP, in its absolute discretion, to request documents of any party to an appeal against a planning decision.

 

The wind farm developer supplied this additional information to ABP. Without giving proper reasons for its decision, and without giving the person who had successfully prevented the planning permission a proper chance to inspect these documents and formulate a reply, the ABP reversed the refusal and granted planning permission for the wind farm.

 

Judge Barrett of the High Court found against the ABP on review. The judge held that when making a decision, the ABP must provide

complete, precise and definitive findings and conclusions of a degree of specificity sufficient that a party minded to seek judicial review of such determination can turn readily to the particular observations, reasoning and conclusions contained in its decisions”.

In other words, the ABP must explain its decision and the reasons therefor in clear detail so that if a person wants to challenge that decision, they know and understand exactly what reasons they need to challenge and why. Similarly, if the ABP rely on any “particular report or text”, that report or text must be identified properly so that a challenger can read it and familiarise themselves with its contents. The ABP did not do so in this case and therefore the ABP was in contravention of ss.177V(1) and 172(1J) of the PDA 2000.

 

The ABP were clearly not happy campers, as this meant that a potentially huge wind farm was going down the drain, and so they appealed Judge Barrett’s decision. However, –  and this is where the fun starts  –  in order to be allowed to appeal, they had to convince Judge Barrett that their points of appeal raised points of law of “exceptional public importance.

 

Needless to say, they failed miserably.

 

Judge Barrett was ruthless as he destroyed ABP’s groundless arguments with surgical precision.

 

He opened his attack with a left-right combination which must have left ABP bleeding from the nose:

 

“That a point of law may relate to a matter of some private significance does not suffice to convert it into “ a point of law of exceptional public importance ”, even where the party claiming such a point to arise is a public body. Moreover, a point of law of exceptional public importance is, by its nature, not just a point of law of public importance (itself a difficult enough hurdle to jump) but of a degree of public importance that is exceptional (a still higher hurdle to be vaulted). In this last regard, the court cannot but note that in the within case it is claimed that the court’s judgment of 14th June last raises up to seven points of law of exceptional public importance; in Aherne & ors v. An Bord Pleanála & ors [2016] IEHC 536, a very recent s.50 judgment that issued while the text of the within judgment was being finalised, some six points of law of exceptional public importance were claimed to arise (all of which were rejected by the court in that case). That two judgments would be contended to raise, between them, some thirteen points of law of exceptional public importance suggests, at the very least, that there is something of a yawning chasm growing between bar and bench as to the true nature of exceptionality.”

 

Ouch!  Real meaning: “Just because it’s important to you , doesn’t necessarily make it important to anybody else. ABP, stop wasting our time”.

 

The ABP argued that Judge Barrett’s decision in Connolly contradicted a number of previous findings of the High Court. The judge dispatched that attack with a backhand slap:

 

“Far from presenting some divergence in case-law, the court expressly concluded, at para. 29 of its judgment of 14th June, that it saw nothing in, inter alia, the decision in Balz, “that would cause it to depart from or vary the reasoning applied, or conclusions reached, in this judgment” . The court remains of that view.”

 

Oooh!  Real meaning: “Did you even read those cases?

 

The ABP then asked what procedure needed to be followed when it did not agree with all or part of its Inspector’s report (which seems to be happening with increasing frequency):

“It is not entirely clear to the court that these are truly points of law; the questions seem to involve the An Bord Pleanála seeking direction as to its practices and procedures. But insofar as these questions do raise points of law as to the applicable obligations, those have been answered clearly in the court’s judgment of 14th June last. Section 172(1J) is plain in its meaning and effect; no cause for certification arises. The court will, therefore, decline to certify Questions [1] and [2].”

 

Oooff!  Real meaning: “Why are you asking me how to do your job?”

 

The ABP then asked the judge what would be the legal consequences of it carrying out an inadequate screening assessment in terms of Section 177U(6) of the PDA 2000?

“Section 177U(6) is clear in meaning and purport. It requires that An Bord Pleanála record and give notice of a positive screening for appropriate assessment. An appropriate assessment done without recording and notifying the screening determination is not done in accordance with law. Thus it does not seem to the court that there is any point of law arising: the statutory duty arising is clear, and there is an abundance of case-law on the consequences of breach of statutory duty. The court will therefore decline to certify Question [3].”

 

Ow!  Real meaning: Can you read?

 

Clearly desperate at this stage, the ABP then put forward a number of very confusing and contradictory questions, and the judge, clearly at the end of his tether, dealt with them all in one fell swoop:

 

“There is nothing uncertain about the obligations presenting for An Bord Pleanála in this regard: they are clearly set out in European law and in the decisions of Sweetman and Kelly, which were applied by the court in its judgment of 14th June. Indeed, to the extent that there is any issue arising in this regard, and the court does not consider that there is, it would arise (if it arose, and it does not) from those earlier decisions, not from the court’s decision of 14th June.”.

 

Ugh!!  Real meaning: “Now you’re just taking the piss!”

 

For too long now ABP have been making decisions without clear explanations as to what they considered in coming to their decision, and their deductive reasoning employed in reaching that decision, particularly when it appoints an inspector and then ignores his report. This judgment is a clear message from the High Court that this type of carry-on will no longer be tolerated.

 

Well done Judge Barrett. Respect!

 

 

“And it’s a left hook, a right hook, another left / right uppercut combination, and ABP is down, it’s down!”

 

“It’s all over, the ref has stopped the fight.”

Posted in Academic Research; Peer-Review Process; Medical Journals, An Bord Pleanala; appeal; interested parties, Apple; Google; Data Centre, BSB Community Energy Ltd, Cloud; iCloud; Data Centre; Data Center, Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, EIA Directive 2014/52/EU, EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Framore Limited, Freedom of Information; Access to Environmental Information; AIE; Commissioner for Environmental Information, Green Party; Ireland; Eamonn Ryan; Cormac Manning, High Court; Judge Caroline Costello; John Callaghan; Leave to Appeal, High Court; Judicial Review; Appeal on the merits; judicial discretion, Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, judicial review; Wednesbury Test; O'Keeffe; rationality; Separation of Powers, Justine McCarthy; The Sunday Times; EMF, Kilvinane Wind Farm Ltd; substituted consent, Law; High Court; Leave To Appeal; Environment, Legal Costs; Access to Justice; Courts, lobbying; democracy; political process; general election, Ms Justice Costello; Section 37A Planning and Development Act 2000;, North-South Interconnector; An Bord Pleanala, NREAP; National Renewable Energy Action Plan; EU Commission; Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee; ACCC, Pat Swords, Paudie Coffey; series compensation; Fine Gael; Alan Kelly; Alex White, Peremptory law; Directory Law; Planning and Devlopment Act of 2000, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Planning Permission; Extension; Planning and Development Act, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters; Aarhus Convention; Aarhus Treaty, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA); Grid 25; North-South Interconnector | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Spain anger over ‘energy poverty’ deaths

granny

An aspect of the renewable energy policy that governments choose to ignore – the rapidly increasing price of electricity and carbon fuels, with the people who need them most being unable to afford what many would regard as a fundamental necessity.

NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

By Paul Homewood

H/Ts Joe Public/Wolsten

image

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-38024374

From the BBC:

Spain’s economy may be recovering, but the recent deaths of a 12-year-old girl and an 81-year-old woman in house fires are reminders of the hardship that millions of households still face in the country’s deep-rooted crisis.

View original post 596 more words

Posted in EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF | 1 Comment

How the Council Spends Our Money — Citizens Against Corruption

Congratulations to the Four Angry Ladies on starting this site, and asking questions that most are too scared to ask.

I would ask two more:

  1. The link between the Comeragh Community Development Group and BSB Energy has already been established. It would be interesting to know what the link between BSB Energy and the hydro station company and/or the Waterford Energy co-op company is? Do the same names appear again and again?
  2. Given that the 105000 euro was public money, did the construction job of the road go out to public tender in terms of public procurement law? For example, the documentation records that on 14 July 2014 CCDG paid Eddie Cunningham Plant Hire the sum of €7933.65. That job should have been put out to tender in terms of the public procurement for services law, or else there could be a perception by the tax-paying public that there is a danger that this becomes “jobs for the boys”.

The other legal aspect that needs to be mentioned is that bogs have recently been the subject of a new EU legal initiative.

The Climate Change Strategy recognises the role of peatland habitats as carbon stores and the significant carbon releases as a result of degradation.

In addition, the Environmental Liability Directive (2004/35/EC) is about preventing and remedying environmental damage. It aims to hold operators whose activities have caused environmental damage financially liable for remedying this damage, and it aims to hold those whose activities have caused an imminent threat of environmental damage liable for taking preventive actions. This most certainly applies to both the WCCC and the CCDG.

Finally, the National Biodiversity Plan recognises that wetlands are of special importance to biodiversity in Ireland. The biodiversity plan mentions that all significant drainage, including initial drainage and maintenance drainage, will require assessment of its implications for biodiversity, and particularly for wetlands. This most certainly applies to the ancient bog in the Mahon Falls valley.

Clearly there are laws that have been broken. The question is – who will enforce this law?

 

We all share wonderful memories of the Mahon Falls – as children going for walks with our parents, as teenagers meeting that special someone in the carpark, and until recently, as grandparents taking their grandchildren along the beautiful path to the Falls themselves. But that beauty has been badly damaged by a deep scar running […]

via How the Council Spends Our Money — Citizens Against Corruption

Posted in Academic Research; Peer-Review Process; Medical Journals, Apple; Google; Data Centre, Arsin Demir, Çalık Holding; Turkey; EU; renewables, Brexit, BSB Community Energy Ltd, Cloud; iCloud; Data Centre; Data Center, Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EIA Directive 2014/52/EU, EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Framore Limited, Freedom of Information; Access to Environmental Information; AIE; Commissioner for Environmental Information, Green Party; Ireland; Eamonn Ryan; Cormac Manning, High Court; Judge Caroline Costello; John Callaghan; Leave to Appeal, High Court; Judicial Review; Appeal on the merits; judicial discretion, Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, judicial review; Wednesbury Test; O'Keeffe; rationality; Separation of Powers, Justine McCarthy; The Sunday Times; EMF, Kilvinane Wind Farm Ltd; substituted consent, Law; High Court; Leave To Appeal; Environment, Legal Costs; Access to Justice; Courts, lobbying; democracy; political process; general election, Ministerial Responsibility; Liability; Negligence; cardiovascular, Ms Justice Costello; Section 37A Planning and Development Act 2000;, North-South Interconnector; An Bord Pleanala, NREAP; National Renewable Energy Action Plan; EU Commission; Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee; ACCC, Pat Swords, Paudie Coffey; series compensation; Fine Gael; Alan Kelly; Alex White, Peremptory law; Directory Law; Planning and Devlopment Act of 2000, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Planning Permission; Extension; Planning and Development Act, Press Freedom, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters; Aarhus Convention; Aarhus Treaty, Refugees; Apartheid; Kulaks; Stalin;, Section 35; ESB Act 1927; wayleave notice, South Africa, wind turbines, developing nations,, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA); Grid 25; North-South Interconnector, The Spokes of the Wheel; wind farms; Ireland; Windfall, The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe’s (UNECE) Convention on Access to Information, Turkey; ABK Çeşme RES Enerji Elektrik Üretim A.Ş, Uncategorized, University Hospital Waterford, Val Martin, Wind Farm Contract, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten, Wind Turbine Syndrome; Professor Alun Evans, Wind Turbines: Esen Fatma Kabadayi Whiting | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Facts and Figures

cro-logo

 

My blog yesterday aroused a huge amount of interest. People expressed shock and surprise at the news that a company cannot be forced to declare a dividend. It is not always fun being the bearer of bad news but I would rather inform my community about what they need to hear, than keep them in the dark by telling them only what they want to hear. As was said more than once at the Monday meeting: we must deal in facts and figures, not spin or hoopla.

 

The other query that I received was asking me where I got my figures concerning the Templederry wind farm that I presented in my talk on Monday. I got them from the company documents that I received from the CRO. If you want to see the whole document, click on the link below:

templederry-windfarm-limited-financial-statement-2015

 

I would like an accountant or auditor to look at the whole document and give us an easy-to-understand explanation on exactly what it means. I am not qualified to do that, and I can only show what I see, without offering any interpretation of what I see, as that is not within my expertise.

My first opinion was that the “community” wind farm was in fact owned by another holding company. The reason I said that is because that is what the CRO document said. Here is a scan of that particular section:

director-remuneration

I also said that despite the shareholders not receiving a red cent, the Directors had been paid, as they are legally entitled to be. You can see that in the above scan, and it also appears earlier in the document, on the previous page:

wages-templederry

Finally, and this was the one that upset the most people, the question of profits and their distribution to shareholders. This is the section that I showed on Monday night, and it says “profit for the year”.  I take that to mean a profit was made by the wind farm? I know that if it was a loss, it would appear in brackets. People have taken this to mean that despite the wind farm making a profit in both 2014 and 2015, the community did not receive a cent.

 

Are these people correct in their interpretation? When people asked me that on the phone, I was careful to say that I did not know, as that is not in my expertise, which is what I also said on Monday night. Again, I would ask that an accountant or auditor please write in my comments section and explain to us what this means. Were there profits of over half a million euro made by the end of 2015?

 

reconciliation-templederry

 

DISCLAIMER: I am not an accountant or auditor. I simply read what was in front of me and others have done the same. If I have somehow misinterpreted these documents, I will hold my hand up and apologise, and I will print a full retraction and apology on this blog. This is about the facts. This is not some sort of vindictive witch-hunt.

I eagerly await the comments of those more qualified than I.

Posted in Academic Research; Peer-Review Process; Medical Journals, An Bord Pleanala; appeal; interested parties, Apple; Google; Data Centre, Brexit, BSB Community Energy Ltd, Cloud; iCloud; Data Centre; Data Center, Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EIA Directive 2014/52/EU, EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Framore Limited, Freedom of Information; Access to Environmental Information; AIE; Commissioner for Environmental Information, Green Party; Ireland; Eamonn Ryan; Cormac Manning, High Court; Judge Caroline Costello; John Callaghan; Leave to Appeal, High Court; Judicial Review; Appeal on the merits; judicial discretion, Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, judicial review; Wednesbury Test; O'Keeffe; rationality; Separation of Powers, Justine McCarthy; The Sunday Times; EMF, Kilvinane Wind Farm Ltd; substituted consent, Law; High Court; Leave To Appeal; Environment, Legal Costs; Access to Justice; Courts, lobbying; democracy; political process; general election, Ministerial Responsibility; Liability; Negligence; cardiovascular, Ms Justice Costello; Section 37A Planning and Development Act 2000;, North-South Interconnector; An Bord Pleanala, NREAP; National Renewable Energy Action Plan; EU Commission; Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee; ACCC, Pat Swords, Paudie Coffey; series compensation; Fine Gael; Alan Kelly; Alex White, Peremptory law; Directory Law; Planning and Devlopment Act of 2000, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Planning Permission; Extension; Planning and Development Act, Press Freedom, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters; Aarhus Convention; Aarhus Treaty, Section 35; ESB Act 1927; wayleave notice, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA); Grid 25; North-South Interconnector, The Spokes of the Wheel; wind farms; Ireland; Windfall, The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe’s (UNECE) Convention on Access to Information, Turkey; ABK Çeşme RES Enerji Elektrik Üretim A.Ş, Wind Farm Contract, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten, Wind Turbine Syndrome; Professor Alun Evans, Wind Turbines: Esen Fatma Kabadayi Whiting | Tagged , , , , , | 11 Comments

The Public Meeting in Rainbow Hall

turbines-on-copper-coast

The turnout at last night’s meeting in Rainbow Hall was huge – well over five hundred people (and we have signed lists to prove that, RTE News). The meeting ended with a very resounding, and unanimous, rejection of the proposed plans of BSB Energy to build an industrial wind farm in Waterford’s World Heritage Site, the Copper Coast.

I am unused to speaking in front of such a huge crowd, so I was very nervous, and I fluffed my lines:  I forgot to introduce myself, I forgot to establish my qualifications and credentials, and I forgot to tell people that despite being a blow-in, I love my adopted country and my community with every fibre of my person. That last remark was meant to be aimed at a particular individual but it didn’t matter as he was too spineless to attend, despite being a major investor in the scheme. I noticed that he did send his lackey to take notes.

In my presentation I was deliberately talking to the investors (standing up all along the back wall) and people who were thinking of investing in BSB Energy. Anyway, just in case these people did not quite get my message, I will repeat the main points again:

A share is a device used by companies to generate funding. You hand them your money and in return you get a share certificate to the amount of your investment. As BSB are issuing shares valued at one euro each, the maths is easy: 100 euro gets you one hundred shares, ten thousand euros gets you ten thousand shares, and so on.

This is why the concept of “free shares” is a contradiction in terms. If shares are used by a company to produce income, why would a company hand out shares without getting money in return? The answer is obvious – the company never intends on paying out dividends on those shares (or it might pay out a few cents on the shares when the complaints start getting too loud – essentially paying a little money for lots of ‘good’ publicity). Unless you can sell them to some other unfortunate, those free shares are not worth the paper they’re printed on.

For those of you who have actually bought shares, the picture is not much rosier. As you have handed over money, you have now invested in the company’s fortunes. Unlike a public company on the stock exchange, where the share value might go up or down depending on the performance of the company, in a private company like BSB the share value is a constant – it keeps its ‘face value’. The only way the ordinary shareholder will make more money is where the company pays a dividend to shareholders, otherwise your investment remains static and in fact loses its value as you are not earning interest on that amount.

What a lot of people do not realise is that a company does not have to declare a dividend. There is no law that forces them to do so, and a shareholder is not entitled to go to court to force a company to declare a dividend. It is entirely a choice of the company if, and when, they declare a dividend, and for how much. A company might be making millions but they do not have to hand over a cent to the shareholders.

I am not making that up – the law is clear:

Usher, in Company Law in Ireland (1996, Sweet and Maxwell) states at p. 87:-

“… the general meeting (of shareholders) cannot force the directors to pay an interim dividend (article 117) or to recommend a final dividend (article 116) …”

The leading Irish case on this is Ryanair v. Aer Lingus [2011] IEHC 170, where the High Court made it clear that a company cannot be forced by its shareholders to pay a dividend:

“[17] The balance sheet which goes before an annual general meeting should contain the profit and loss account, a report by the directors and the auditor’s report. Section 158 of the Companies Act 1963 requires that the directors’ report must state the amount (if any) which they recommend should be paid by way of dividend. The directors’ report for the year ended the 31st December, 2010 states:-

“The directors do not propose the payment of dividends in respect of the year ended the 31st December, 2010.”

When these words are considered in the light of s. 158 of the Act of 1963, it seems clear to me that they are a recommendation by the board to the annual general meeting that no dividends be paid in respect of that year. A dividend does not become payable unless it is declared by one of the organs of the company. While the Companies Act 1963 does not specify which organ of the company should declare a dividend, it is usual for the articles of association to provide that it is to be declared by the company in a general meeting and it is not to exceed such amount as is recommended by the directors. That is precisely what is provided for in article 111 of the articles of association. I accept the submissions of the defendant that the directors have recommended to the members that no dividend be paid and that the first of the proposed resolutions by the plaintiff seeks to circumvent article 111. This is not permissible. The company was entitled to refuse to put this resolution before the annual general meeting since it was not within the power of the members by ordinary resolution to declare a dividend which exceeded the amount recommended by the directors. In this case, the directors were recommending no dividend.”

What this means is that you might have paid a lot of money to buy a lot of shares, but if the company does not declare a dividend, your investment does not increase in value. The only way you can make a profit then is to sell your shares to some other sucker for a profit. Good luck with that – to say that the community is hostile and angry is an understatement!

The proof of the pudding is the Templederry experience. Despite being launched seventeen years ago, the community has not seen a single return on their investment. This is despite the fact that Templederry Windfarm Limited declared a profit of over half a million euro at the end of the 2015 financial year. The community (“ordinary”) shareholders of the wind farm have not received a red cent.

This was confirmed by Paul Kenny of Tipperary Energy Agency, the advisors to both the Tipperary wind farm and the proposed BSB wind farm:

“As with all windfarms, the dividends to the shareholders (in Templederry’s case, individuals and the local community co-operative), is paid after a significant portion of the loans are repaid, which has not happened yet, neither the co-operative, directors or shareholders have received any dividend, but it will commence in due course.”

There is nothing illegal in this as the company does not have to declare a dividend. But that is cold comfort to the people who were hoping for a return on their investment, or the people who have to live next to these monsters, as we heard last night.

Similarly, there is nothing illegal in the fact that the directors of the Templederry Wind Farm paid themselves a salary every year (amounting in total to 27000 euro in 2014 and 28023 euro in 2015). They are entitled to do that, but again the legality of that is cold comfort to the investor who has received nothing for seventeen years.

The next step in the process for the communities opposing the proposed BSB wind farm is their consultation on Wednesday. Please attend that session and ask all the questions about anything you need to know, and record their answers for use in your submissions to the County Council, should the need arise.

Details of these questions and other information can be found on the Mahon Valley Against Turbines Facebook page.

Just to remind people what will happen to our community if this wind farm goes ahead, I received the following from Paddy Ryan, a resident in Templederry:

This ‘new’ idea of ‘Community Windfarms’ is a really bad one. I know people around Templederry who wanted to ‘invest’ in this but were kept out of the loop because some locals wanted it all for themselves, he’s really glad now as the local people are up in arms with those who fought to get these into the area. There’s no longer the community of neighbours left and children are being sent to ‘other’ schools so that they don’t have to interact with each other because of the decisions their parents made all those years ago.
The information about these Industrial Generators wasn’t as available back then as it is now and some people used to think it was a good idea, myself included, what could be better than availing of a natural resource but there’s nothing natural about these huge monstrosities on our landscape. They’re noisy, they’re killing off wild birds in their thousands, they’re causing low-land flooding with all the cement used in the upland hills, tearing through the land, removing the wild vegetation and forestry that used to soak up the rain.
My ESB bills have doubled in the last 10 years, and now companies see the subsidies drying up so they’re pawning them off as some sort of community advantage.
These people will stop at nothing to make money and they care not one bit for the communities who are left to try to live with the consequences of their actions.
The Copper Coast is one of the most outstanding areas of natural beauty in the South East of Ireland and is only becoming recognised by our tourists. I understand people in the area need to make a living and are inclined to take advantage of every opportunity but this isn’t an opportunity for local people, this is another scam from big business.
People need to be more aware of the consequences.”

Posted in Academic Research; Peer-Review Process; Medical Journals, An Bord Pleanala; appeal; interested parties, Brexit, BSB Community Energy Ltd, Cloud; iCloud; Data Centre; Data Center, Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EIA Directive 2014/52/EU, EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Framore Limited, Freedom of Information; Access to Environmental Information; AIE; Commissioner for Environmental Information, Green Party; Ireland; Eamonn Ryan; Cormac Manning, High Court; Judge Caroline Costello; John Callaghan; Leave to Appeal, High Court; Judicial Review; Appeal on the merits; judicial discretion, Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, judicial review; Wednesbury Test; O'Keeffe; rationality; Separation of Powers, Justine McCarthy; The Sunday Times; EMF, Kilvinane Wind Farm Ltd; substituted consent, Law; High Court; Leave To Appeal; Environment, Legal Costs; Access to Justice; Courts, lobbying; democracy; political process; general election, Ministerial Responsibility; Liability; Negligence; cardiovascular, Ms Justice Costello; Section 37A Planning and Development Act 2000;, North-South Interconnector; An Bord Pleanala, NREAP; National Renewable Energy Action Plan; EU Commission; Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee; ACCC, Pat Swords, Paudie Coffey; series compensation; Fine Gael; Alan Kelly; Alex White, Peremptory law; Directory Law; Planning and Devlopment Act of 2000, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Planning Permission; Extension; Planning and Development Act, Press Freedom, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters; Aarhus Convention; Aarhus Treaty, Refugees; Apartheid; Kulaks; Stalin;, Section 35; ESB Act 1927; wayleave notice, South Africa, wind turbines, developing nations,, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA); Grid 25; North-South Interconnector, The Spokes of the Wheel; wind farms; Ireland; Windfall, Turkey; ABK Çeşme RES Enerji Elektrik Üretim A.Ş, University Hospital Waterford, Wind Farm Contract, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten, Wind Turbine Syndrome; Professor Alun Evans | 4 Comments

Please Save the Copper Coast!

notice-of-meetingThe Copper Coast in County Waterford, Ireland is a UNESCO World Heritage Site of breathtaking natural beauty. It is hard to imagine that anybody would want to build an industrial wind farm right in the middle of it, but apparently such individuals do exist.

Please attend the public meeting in Rainbow Hall, Kilmacthomas, at 8.00 p.m. this evening, and tell us what you think.

And for those of you who think it offers a great financial opportunity to “make a few pound”, this is what Paul Kenny of Tipperary Energy Agency (who advise on setting up ‘community’ wind farms) had to say of the “model” community wind farm in Templederry, which was launched seventeen years ago (in 1999) and has been producing for four years (since 2012) :

“As with all windfarms, the dividends to the share holders (in Templederry’s case, individuals and the local community co-operative), is paid after a significant portion of the loans are repaid, which has not happened yet, neither the co-operative, directors or shareholders have received any dividend, but it will commence in due course.”

That is a nice way of saying that after waiting for seventeen years to see a return on their investment, the good people of Templederry have yet to see a red cent.

8.00 p.m.. Monday 14 November 2016 (today)

Rainbow Hall, Kilmacthomas, County Waterford.

Posted in Academic Research; Peer-Review Process; Medical Journals, An Bord Pleanala; appeal; interested parties, Apple; Google; Data Centre, Arsin Demir, Çalık Holding; Turkey; EU; renewables, Brexit, BSB Community Energy Ltd, Cloud; iCloud; Data Centre; Data Center, Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EIA Directive 2014/52/EU, EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Framore Limited, Green Party; Ireland; Eamonn Ryan; Cormac Manning, High Court; Judge Caroline Costello; John Callaghan; Leave to Appeal, Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, judicial review; Wednesbury Test; O'Keeffe; rationality; Separation of Powers, Justine McCarthy; The Sunday Times; EMF, Kilvinane Wind Farm Ltd; substituted consent, Law; High Court; Leave To Appeal; Environment, lobbying; democracy; political process; general election, Ministerial Responsibility; Liability; Negligence; cardiovascular, Ms Justice Costello; Section 37A Planning and Development Act 2000;, North-South Interconnector; An Bord Pleanala, NREAP; National Renewable Energy Action Plan; EU Commission; Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee; ACCC, Pat Swords, Paudie Coffey; series compensation; Fine Gael; Alan Kelly; Alex White, Peremptory law; Directory Law; Planning and Devlopment Act of 2000, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Planning Permission; Extension; Planning and Development Act, Press Freedom, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters; Aarhus Convention; Aarhus Treaty, Refugees; Apartheid; Kulaks; Stalin;, Section 35; ESB Act 1927; wayleave notice, South Africa, wind turbines, developing nations,, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA); Grid 25; North-South Interconnector, The Spokes of the Wheel; wind farms; Ireland; Windfall, Turkey; ABK Çeşme RES Enerji Elektrik Üretim A.Ş | 2 Comments

Enough Already!!!

me

 

A certain individual has been going around my community spreading particularly malicious rumours about me. For a while it was a pathetic joke, but it has to stop now.

 

One of the malicious lies being spread by this individual is that I have been behind a number of personal attacks on the Facebook page of Comeragh Against Pylons. I resigned as the CAP page administrator in October 2015 and anyone who says otherwise is a liar. The fact that this individual was present at the meeting at which I resigned, and that he was present when another committee member was appointed to replace me, is a puzzle to me. The CAP page very kindly publishes my blog when I submit it to them, but apart from that, I have been concentrating my energies elsewhere, fighting the wind industry and their cronies.

 

One of the things I have been involved with is supporting Declan McGrath in his application to An Bord Pleanala to stop the continued construction of the illegal road that has destroyed an ancient bog in the Mahon Falls valley . Many of you know Declan and his wonderful books on the Comeraghs. He knows more about our area than anybody else I know, and his love for the beauty of our country is infectious. In addition to helping Declan, I have always been suspicious that the road was put in to permit heavy vehicles to access the privately-owned hydro-electric plant, but that is a personal opinion only, and so far I have not been able to uncover any proof to link the two. If anybody has any information on that, I would love to hear from you.

In any event, the destruction of the ancient bog and many of the beautiful trees that once grew there angered me so much that I made an FOI request for all the documentation between the Comeragh Community Development Group and the Waterford County Council regarding the use of public money to finance this illegal development (it is illegal as the area is a Special Area of Conservation that requires planning permission and a comprehensive EIS, none of which exist). That documentation makes very interesting reading indeed, with the same names appearing again and again. If anybody wants a copy of those public documents, feel free to contact me.

 

The names of these same individuals have again appeared in my investigation of the proposed community wind farm by BSB, and I do not think that it is a coincidence that the frequency of the personal attacks on me and my family have increased dramatically since I published my blog on the proposed community wind farm that intends putting turbines in a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

I was a solicitor for five years, and a barrister for ten years, where I tried to do as much good for people that I could manage, and my ex-clients will vouch for that. Despite this individual calling me “a blow-in who should go back to South Africa”, I have now lived in this country for almost fifteen years and have worked as a lecturer at WIT where I do the best for the students that I teach. My reputation is therefore not only important to me, but to all the people that rely on me. I have also made many good friends in a community that I love and I intend to live out my years right here.

 

It is for that reason that I am sending a message out to those who would seek to blacken my name: “Enough already!”

Posted in Academic Research; Peer-Review Process; Medical Journals, An Bord Pleanala; appeal; interested parties, Apple; Google; Data Centre, Arsin Demir, Çalık Holding; Turkey; EU; renewables, Brexit, BSB Community Energy Ltd, Cloud; iCloud; Data Centre; Data Center, Democracy; Ireland; Fine Gael; Labour; Sinn Fein; Workers; Constitution, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EIA Directive 2014/52/EU, EirGrid; Insurance; Law; Cancer; EMF, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Framore Limited, Freedom of Information; Access to Environmental Information; AIE; Commissioner for Environmental Information, Green Party; Ireland; Eamonn Ryan; Cormac Manning, High Court; Judge Caroline Costello; John Callaghan; Leave to Appeal, High Court; Judicial Review; Appeal on the merits; judicial discretion, Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, judicial review; Wednesbury Test; O'Keeffe; rationality; Separation of Powers, Justine McCarthy; The Sunday Times; EMF, Kilvinane Wind Farm Ltd; substituted consent, Law; High Court; Leave To Appeal; Environment, Legal Costs; Access to Justice; Courts, lobbying; democracy; political process; general election, Ministerial Responsibility; Liability; Negligence; cardiovascular, Ms Justice Costello; Section 37A Planning and Development Act 2000;, North-South Interconnector; An Bord Pleanala, NREAP; National Renewable Energy Action Plan; EU Commission; Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee; ACCC, Pat Swords, Paudie Coffey; series compensation; Fine Gael; Alan Kelly; Alex White, Peremptory law; Directory Law; Planning and Devlopment Act of 2000, Planning and Development Act 2000; guidelines; directives; Sections 28 & 29, Planning Permission; Extension; Planning and Development Act, Press Freedom, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters; Aarhus Convention; Aarhus Treaty, Refugees; Apartheid; Kulaks; Stalin;, Section 35; ESB Act 1927; wayleave notice, South Africa, wind turbines, developing nations,, Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA); Grid 25; North-South Interconnector, The Spokes of the Wheel; wind farms; Ireland; Windfall, The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe’s (UNECE) Convention on Access to Information, Turkey; ABK Çeşme RES Enerji Elektrik Üretim A.Ş, University Hospital Waterford, Val Martin, Wind Farm Contract, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten, Wind Turbine Syndrome; Professor Alun Evans | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

LAUGH, or go mad.

14963201_1507548785938713_491995881556608628_n

Image | Posted on by | 1 Comment

The End of Community: Wind Farms

 

A press release that has been met with sharply divided opinions was released by the BSB energy group:

BSB propose community wind farm for County Waterford
BSB Community Energy Ltd. (BSB) is a limited company established by a substantial number (50+) of local people in the Bunmahon, Stradbally and Ballylaneen area of the county to promote a ground-breaking wind energy project which will be 100% community owned.
The project is striving to become only the second 100% community owned wind farm in Ireland, the other is in Templederry, Co. Tipperary. It is widely acknowledged in the wind renewables industry that the future of wind in Ireland will be dependent on communities taking control of these projects and this is exactly what BSB is striving to achieve. While a community wind farm is still a business, it is owned by the community and therefore the community will reap the rewards that this business generates.
Paddy Power, Chairman of BSB Community wind energy said “This is an opportunity for the communities of Ballylaneen, Stradbally and Bunmahon to take a positive step to reduce our carbon emissions as well as a €60m investment in our parish that will give a massive boost to local communities for generations to come. Wind Turbines need to be treated as something that brings benefits to a community and should not be feared. BSB is aware that noise and shadow flicker might be of concern to the community. Therefore, the turbines proposed are set back a minimum of 500m from residences and are using the latest technology to mitigate against these concerns. The Environmental Impact Statement being prepared by Jennings O’Donovan our consulting engineers will address these concerns in detail.
BSB propose to build an 11 turbine windfarm, producing up to 33MW of electricity, which is the equivalent of powering up to 17,300 homes (equivalent to approx. half of all homes in Waterford City and County). During the construction phase, employment will be created on a local, regional and national level.
BSB propose to provide the following benefits to the community;
1. FREE shares to community clubs, groups, schools and churches (Est at 80K per annum*)
2. Free shares in trust to a community fund for strategic community projects. (Est at 80K per annum*)
3. A FREE share for every property in the parish.
4. FREE shares with an equivalent dividend of an average electricity bill to every dwelling house within 1Km of each turbine.
5. Save a fund (approx. €10 million*) during the life of the wind farm that will provide the community an opportunity to finance another renewable energy project in the future.
Paddy Power said “It’s taking a long time to bring this project to this stage and finally we can now bring our proposed project to the wider community for consultation. Nobody has ever invested this sort of money in our community before or are likely to again. This is your windfarm and your opportunity to get behind this project.”
Community consultation will take place in the Barron Hall, Stradbally on Wednesday 16th November from 3:00pm to 8:00pm. Following feedback, it is expected that BSB will make a formal planning application within 6 weeks to Waterford County Council.
*Estimates given are based on potential revenues achieved with an 11 turbine windfarm and subject to change pending on number of turbines constructed, energy & carbon price fluctuations and power purchase agreements.

 

Let’s take a closer look at these claims:
“BSB Community Energy Ltd. (BSB) is a limited company established by a substantial number (50+) of local people in the Bunmahon, Stradbally and Ballylaneen area of the county to promote a ground-breaking wind energy project which will be 100% community owned.”

.
It would be very interesting to see the list of names and addresses of these “local people”. I know of at least two of the major investors in this project whose family homes are a considerable distance away from the BSB parishes although they do have property in the parish. What qualifies you as “local”?

.
Tipperary Energy Agency is the muscle behind this, and they are clearly not a charity. What is their financial stake in this?

.
How is it possible then to be “100% community owned”? What does that even mean? BSB Community Energy is registered with the CRO as having a share capital of €100 000.00 comprising of 100 000 shares of €1 each. Does this mean that the two directors, Paddy Power and Harry Grey, will each get one share, along with 99998 other “local people”? Or will it be that a handful of people will own most of the shares (and the profits) and the community will be left with the crumbs under the table in return for a wrecked community?    bdb-energy-2  bdb-energy-1

.
These are the sorts of questions that need to be asked.

 

“The project is striving to become only the second 100% community owned wind farm in Ireland, the other is in Templederry, Co. Tipperary. It is widely acknowledged in the wind renewables industry that the future of wind in Ireland will be dependent on communities taking control of these projects and this is exactly what BSB is striving to achieve. While a community wind farm is still a business, it is owned by the community and therefore the community will reap the rewards that this business generates.”

.

The obvious question is that if these things are such a good idea, why, after more than 20 years of wind energy, is there only one in existence on the entire island? What the press release does not mention is that there have been a number of other similar projects and all have ended in failure (for example, Bere island, Cork and Cape Clear Island, Cork).

.

To be fair, there are some other community owned projects but these are very small (for example, on the island of Inis Meain of the Aran islands – three small turbines (225kW) and Burtonport, Donegal – one 660kW turbine). These are owned by the locals and meet local electricity needs in their search for energy independence.

.
The other issue of concern is that I have done extensive searches for information on the benefits to the good people of Templederry and I came up with nothing. No mention of any new sportsgrounds, parks, playgrounds, clinics, school buildings, community halls, etc. paid for by the profits from the wind farm. Have there been any profits? Have there been any tangible benefits to the entire community?

.
These are the questions I would ask.

.

“Paddy Power, Chairman of BSB Community wind energy said “This is an opportunity for the communities of Ballylaneen, Stradbally and Bunmahon to take a positive step to reduce our carbon emissions as well as a €60m investment in our parish that will give a massive boost to local communities for generations to come. Wind Turbines need to be treated as something that brings benefits to a community and should not be feared. BSB is aware that noise and shadow flicker might be of concern to the community. Therefore, the turbines proposed are set back a minimum of 500m from residences and are using the latest technology to mitigate against these concerns. The Environmental Impact Statement being prepared by Jennings O’Donovan our consulting engineers will address these concerns in detail. “

.

It is remarkable that a project that claims to be community-based is planning to erect giant turbines within 500 metres of people’s houses when even the current Minister for energy has publicly admitted that this is an inadequate distance. Extensive research has shown that ‘inadequate’ is putting it mildly – he is the Minister after all – such a short distance is downright dangerous.

.
History has also shown us that these are not community projects at all, as they tend to decimate communities with the in-fighting and a massive drop in property prices. As the multi-award winning documentary “Windfall” so clearly illustrated, communities have been devastated by the arrival of wind farms owned by either locals or the community themselves. Indeed, two prominent residents (and local employers) in the BSB area have already announced that they will take their five children out of the local school (probably resulting in its closure) should the BSB wind farm go ahead. They will most certainly not be the last prominent residents to vote with their feet.

.
The following quote, describing a split community in Maine over a proposed community wind farm, has been replicated all over the world, including France, Germany and Denmark – the so-called ‘leaders’ in community wind farming:

“About 27 people spoke at the meeting, many of them familiar faces to anyone who has been to one of these meetings. The speakers were split almost evenly in each camp, as was the crowd.
If there’s one thing that was markedly different from previous meetings, it was the way that the crowd itself was divided, both physically and ideologically.”

.

To describe these ventures as community projects is simply not true – they are driven by a few self-serving individuals who very often are not in close proximity to the proposed site and therefore do not stand to be directly affected by the turbines, but reap the profits. To offer to pay somebody the equivalent of their electricity bill in exchange for having their lives wrecked and their home (and most valuable asset) rendered worthless is deeply cynical, to say the least.

.
As for carbon reducing – I would hardly describe the BSB area as a high carbon production zone, given its predominately rural locality – cow farts are a much bigger problem. On the other hand, massive steel turbines with mind-boggling amounts of concrete and cement needed to build their foundations are the product of huge CO2 emissions, never mind the contamination of the groundwater and the impact on the surrounding fauna and flora; and of course, the poor wretches that will have to live next door to these monsters.

.

“BSB propose to build an 11 turbine windfarm, producing up to 33MW of electricity, which is the equivalent of powering up to 17,300 homes (equivalent to approx. half of all homes in Waterford City and County). During the construction phase, employment will be created on a local, regional and national level.”

.

If this is a local community project, why is it necessary to produce enough electricity to power over 17000 homes? Why not just one medium-sized turbine to power homes in the BSB parishes (the achievement of energy independence being the goal, rather than lining the developer’s pockets)?

.

What exactly will those jobs be and how long will they last? The turbines and supporting infrastructure are not manufactured locally, they will not be transported by local companies and once wind farms are up they pretty much run themselves. So what are these jobs going to be?

These are the questions that need to be asked.

.
And finally, all those free shares, geared to make even an opponent’s eyes light up at the prospect of free loot. Firstly, one must decide whether you will make enough money to buy a new house elsewhere, when your own home becomes impossible to live in and impossible to sell, meaning you are trapped in a literal madhouse. Secondly, let’s look at the Templederry experience: launched in 1999, planning permission in 2003, grid connection agreement in 2007, started producing in 2012. Profits – who knows when?Hardly a ‘quick buck’ then – what is the use of “free” shares when they are not producing income? Thirdly, when mention is made of millions, what percentage of that is earned by your paltry share certificate – usually a tiny fraction of nett income, whittled down to nothing after tax. Is the money worth sacrificing your community?

.

“Another community wind energy project in the pipeline at present is that at Templederry, Co. Tipperary where two wind farms are planned: a small fully community owned farm with three 1.3MW turbines and another of 40MW to be owned by a group of local farmers”.
(taken from “Catch the Wind – The Potential for Community Ownership of Wind Farms in Ireland”).tocatchthewind

It must be noted that the Templederry community aspect is a very small wind farm, but it was joined by a much larger commercial wind farm as part of the deal. The fact that the large commercial farm is owned by local farmers hardly makes it a “community project”!

.

Even the wind energy supporters are not that upbeat about community wind farms. For example, in its publication, “Catch the Wind – The Potential for Community Ownership of Wind Farms in Ireland”, the Renewable Energy Partnership came to this conclusion after discussing the relatively few community wind farms in Ireland:

“Meitheal na Gaoithe was set up as a co-operative to promote the development of wind and other renewable energies in ways that will allow farmers, communities and other groups to retain the financial and social benefits of wind farms in their areas. It provides information and support to its members and highlights issues at national and EU level.
Until the end of 2003, Meitheal na Gaoithe held numerous workshops around the country supported by the Renewable Energy Information Office and involving international experts. In spite of high levels of participation the workshops were discontinued. Meitheal na Gaoithe’s chairperson, Tommy Cooke, says that the organisation took this step because of the losses that small and medium-sized wind farm developers had experienced as a result of failed planning applications and unsuccessful feasibility studies.
For example, projects that had succeeded in gaining planning approval were now at serious risk because they could not get Power Purchase Agreements, he added.
This meant that the developers were not able to apply for grid connections and their projects were impossible to finance. Meitheal na Gaoithe estimated that approximately €4 million had been lost by small and medium-sized developers to date with at least €1 million being lost on failed planning applications.
‘Small-scale community wind energy developments may have public support and are important for the development of positive public attitudes towards the technology however the actual mechanisms to deliver these projects have failed. The policies that operate to support small-scale renewable energy development are weak and favour large developers. In spite of the setbacks, we are determined to ensure that the benefits of renewable energy are made available to the rural communities’ Mr. Cooke added.

Apart from those minor objections – sure, it sounds like a grand idea.

Posted in BSB Community Energy Ltd, Dr Sarah Laurie; Steve Cooper; Bob McMurtry; Alun Evans, EU Renewable Energy 2020 Target, Irish Farmers Association; IFA; wind farm contracts, The Spokes of the Wheel; wind farms; Ireland; Windfall, Wind Farm Contract, Wind Farm Guidelines, turbines, flicker, noise, distance, Denis Naughten, Wind Turbine Syndrome; Professor Alun Evans, Wind Turbines: Esen Fatma Kabadayi Whiting | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 38 Comments