Hateful Eight: 8 Solid Reasons Why Subsidised Wind Power is Both Pointless & Harmful to Health & Wealth

I always prefer to turn the tables and ask people: so tell me what is good about wind turbines? When they present the usual fallacious arguments, you shoot them down in flames (metaphorically speaking).

STOP THESE THINGS

If wind power was a horse, its owner would have shot it long ago. Instead, cheered on by ideological zealots and endlessly pumped up with performance enhancing subsidies it continues to lumber on regardless.

Impossibly chaotic in its delivery, it never starts the race on time and continually fails to finish, even when it manages to get out of the stalls.

As STT followers are well aware, this site is dedicated to hammering the wind industry and the baggage train of leeches who seek to profit from it.

In Germany, our doppelgänger is NoTricksZone, which continues to deliver the goods, on the same score. In this piece Pierre Gosselin pulls together a Hateful Eight: 8 very solid reasons to hate wind power, with a passion.

Wind Energy’s 8 Serious Disadvantages: Hurts Everything From Wealth To Health
No Tricks Zone
Pierre Gosselin
16 July 2017

What follows is a list of reasons…

View original post 611 more words

About Neil van Dokkum

Neil van Dokkum (B. SocSc; LLB; LLM; PGC Con.Lit) Neil is a law lecturer and has been so since arriving in Ireland from South Africa in 2002. Prior to that Neil worked in a leading firm of solicitors from 1987-1992, before being admitted as an Advocate of the Supreme Court of South Africa (a barrister) in 1992. He published three books in South Africa on employment law and unfair dismissal, as well as being published in numerous national and international peer-reviewed journals. Neil currently specialises in employment law, medical negligence law, family law and child protection law. He dabbles in EU law (procurement and energy). Neil retired from practice in 2002 to take up a full-time lecturing post. He has published three books since then, “Nursing Law for Irish Students (2005); “Evidence” (2007); and “Nursing Law for Students in Ireland” (2011). He is an accredited and practising mediator and is busy writing a book, with Dr Sinead Conneely, on Mediation in Ireland. His current interest is Ireland’s energy policy and its impact on the people and the environment. He is also researching the area of disability as a politico-economic construct. Neil is very happily married to Fiona, and they have two sons, Rory and Ian.
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