The Wind is ‘Free’ Myth – Totally Busted: the True & Staggering Cost of Wind Power

“If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic and/or military consequences of the lie. It thus becomes vitally important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the truth is the greatest enemy of the State.” (Joseph Goebbels, Nazi Propaganda Minister).

Despite the obvious truth, the wind industry keeps repeating its lies, until they become their truth and are repeated in the popular media. Look at the facts people, not the wind industry spin.

STOP THESE THINGS

mythbusters2

Wind worshippers continue to make wild claims about wind power already being “free” – and, apparently, getting cheaper all the time.

Although, it appears that selling a product with no commercial value (apart from the massive subsidies it attracts) is getting tougher all the time. Even the merest mention of a cut to subsidies has the wind industry’s parasites quaking in their boots.

Now – in a ‘hey, quick, look over there!’ kind of move – the wind industry’s spruikers have taken to making claims about the costs of wind power, that would make Pinocchio blush.

Wind: Still Two Or Three Times The Cost Of Conventional Energy, Whatever The Greenies Claim
Breitbart.com
James Delingpole
19 October 2015

headline

That was the headline in the Independent this time last week. I’m not suggesting for a moment that you’re an Independent reader but suppose for a moment you were: what do you…

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About Neil van Dokkum

Neil van Dokkum (B. SocSc; LLB; LLM; PGC Con.Lit) Neil is a law lecturer and has been so since arriving in Ireland from South Africa in 2002. Prior to that Neil worked in a leading firm of solicitors from 1987-1992, before being admitted as an Advocate of the Supreme Court of South Africa (a barrister) in 1992. He published three books in South Africa on employment law and unfair dismissal, as well as being published in numerous national and international peer-reviewed journals. Neil currently specialises in employment law, medical negligence law, family law and child protection law. He dabbles in EU law (procurement and energy). Neil retired from practice in 2002 to take up a full-time lecturing post. He has published three books since then, “Nursing Law for Irish Students (2005); “Evidence” (2007); and “Nursing Law for Students in Ireland” (2011). He is an accredited and practising mediator and is busy writing a book, with Dr Sinead Conneely, on Mediation in Ireland. His current interest is Ireland’s energy policy and its impact on the people and the environment. He is also researching the area of disability as a politico-economic construct. Neil is very happily married to Fiona, and they have two sons, Rory and Ian.
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One Response to The Wind is ‘Free’ Myth – Totally Busted: the True & Staggering Cost of Wind Power

  1. Shawn says:

    Well, the wind IS free, just like coal and uranium in the ground are also free. All forms of energy, as found in nature, start out as free. Wind turbines are not free and they don’t last forever. When the cost of the wind turbine is included, as it should be in a proper accounting of costs, wind power is usually found to be very expensive.

    But even if we agree to the claim that wind power is cheaper, then it shouldn’t need any subsidies or mandates. Right?

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